Monthly Archives: March 2019

I Shared a Video #MFRWAuthor

At a recent Agility class, I had our run videoed to record our progress. It was probably

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Biddy at home

the worst run Biddy has offered in a long time…the earlier ones that day were so much better. And I gotta say I don’t look all that attractive. In fact I look fat. Mainly because I am fat. No one can body shame us the way we body shame ourselves.

Yes, fat body. YES fat body RUNNING. Not fast maybe but still running. Not at the place I want myself to be. Not at the place where my contemporaries who have applied themselves to intense physical training might be but way ahead of those who are going to get more exercise ‘one day’

And they will. I’m seeing more and more people checking their fitness trackers, doing their steps or stretches at airports. Maybe walking around their cars before getting in so they can meet that 250/hour goal. For them, for me, I’m sharing this reality. As long as we keep moving, we will keep winning in this game of life,

 

 

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Living in the Love #MFRWAuthor

I’ve been noodling with this blog for a while, wanting to share some silly memories…after the news from New Zealand, I thought we could all use a touch of happy

Those of us of a ‘certain age’ remember “Folk” songs. We listened to them, sang them, shared them. And sometimes we believed in them, or at least wanted to believe in them. Looking back it seems that might have been a simpler time, when we thought words sung could change the world. Kind of hard to believe that now, when words are all too often used to hurt, to tear down instead of build up.

But the memories. Oh, the memories. Sitting around a campfire, or a living room, raising our voices in harmony (or lack thereof) Singing of peace, love, and rock and roll. Oh, wait, that  might be another blog.

There were the famous folk singers, but there were also not so famous people who shared their thoughts and love. Like my girlhood crush, Leonard Nimoy, singing Paul Young’s Love of the Common People

 

Living on free food tickets
Water in the milk
From a hole in the roof
Where the rain came through
What can you do, hmmm?

Tears from your little sister
Crying because she doesn’t have
A dress without a patch
For the party to go
But you know she’ll get by

‘Cause she’s living in
The love of the common people
Smiles from the heart
Of a family man

Daddy’s gonna buy you
A dream to cling to
Mama’s gonna love you
Just as much as she can
And she can https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/paulyoung/loveofthecommonpeople.html (for the rest)

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It’s All About the Subtext #MFRWAuthor

Here I am back blogging. It’s been…wow, a while. I’ve started blogs and put them aside to finish ‘later,’ when I wasn’t distracted by sunshine or snow or Salukis or pretty much anything! Let’s see if I can do better. Way back, when I first started taking my writing seriously, a best selling author explained how to engage readers by using ‘theme’ in our books. Research defines theme as a main idea or an underlying meaning of a literary work, which may be stated directly or indirectly. I’ve noticed this while reading, all too often being bludgeoned by the theme of a book. Until I want to say “Okay, I get it, prom dresses are important.” I’m doubt we’d find that sort of theme in a literary work. But I don’t write Literary. I write Romance, in many varied forms. Since I write romance, generally not considered literary work, theme becomes trope, which is an overused theme or device: Hidden Baby, Rich Man and Gorgeous Poor Girl, Muscled Military Man…you know what I mean. And you know generally by reading the title, or glancing at the cover, what you’ll find in that book. Which makes for quick decisions for readers, and some very popular books. Within these tropes, or within popular sub-genres, we find on occasion subtle and often fascinating sub-plot points. Sometimes these lead to greater story or character depth but often they become a sly way for the author to interject…subtext. a hidden or less obvious meaning Subtext or undertone is any content of a creative work which is not announced explicitly by the characters or author, but is implicit or becomes something understood by the observer of the work as the production unfolds. I’ve found great examples in Anne Bishop’s “Others” series. Who wouldn’t want to be able to ‘send in the big guns’ when someone blatantly destroys the environment? Science Fiction and Space Opera are loaded with subtext, too much of which speaks to ‘the more things change the more they are the same.’ Sure we can go to the stars but that doesn’t mean we’ll be better people once we get there. As with subliminal messages (a certain tie, or hat, or color) subtext can shape our future. Gene Roddenberry was a master of subtext, with an implied promise of “We CAN be better.” It seems it will be up to us which path we choose to take.

I’ve been playing with BookBrush

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